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Apps in Publishing

twitter cross stitch

If you were to do a Twitter search on the word ‘publishing’ you might see that there’s a lot of chat on there at the moment about apps and whether they are the future of the industry.  In March, Forbes said we were at the dawn of the tablet era  which was leading publishers to look at enhanced eBooks and the like.  Fastforward to last weekend, when Vicki Hartley wrote on the Future Bookseller that the death of publishing has been greatly exaggerated, and that apps are here to save it.

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You Are Not A Writer: Why Opinion Matters

Another guest post from Lucy Redland, who also wrote a post about the pros and cons of getting a literary agent in a post a few weeks back.

Over the last decade or so, it seems as if there has been an explosion in the numbers of writing courses and workshops available. From postgraduate degrees to courses run in local libraries, everyone can take a writing course now.  But does that mean everyone can be a writer?

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The Book Blogger Files #4 – The Lit Bitch

In this latest book blogger profile, I chat to historical fiction and travel enthusiast The Lit Bitch about King Edward, Harry Potter and sinking your teeth into a good reading challenge.

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The Book Blogger Files #3 – Rob Around Books

Continuing my journey through the secret world of book bloggers, I spoke to Rob Burdock – also known as Rob Around Books – about Just William, eBooks and the Father of History.

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The Book Blogger Files #1 – Roof Beam Reader

There are approximately 8 zillion trillion gillian book blogs on the internet – but how do you know whether the reviews on there will actually match your own tastes?  I figured one way might be to find out a little bit more about the people writing them.  This is why I now present The Book Blogger Files – a series of interviews with the mysterious literary enthusiasts behind the keyboards.  First up, freelance essayist and creative writer Adam Burgess, also known as Roof Beam Reader (the name is a reference to a story by J.D.Salinger).

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Interview: Steve Augarde

Steve Augarde is an author, illustrator and paper engineer who has written four novels for older kids and over 70 picture books for younger ones.  He also provided the artwork and music for Bump the Elephant, a cartoon you may remember if you were a small person or parent in the early 1990s.  I spoke to him about designing pop up books, 30 years of writing for children, and the possibility he may be responsible for electronic birthday cards…

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Should You Choose a Pseudonym?

Occasionally, the fact I sign my name as the fairly androgynous ‘Ali’ leads people to assume I am a man.  This belies the fact that however peppered with links to my online endeavours my email signature may be, most recipients of my missives can’t be arsed clicking them.

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Foreshadows: Changing the way we read

Every so often, someone comes along and tries to change the way we do things.

This is particularly relevant in the world of the written word.  When some genius decided to go from cave paintings to papyrus scrolls* there was uproar in the publishing industry.  Nobody had done it before and so nobody could envision doing it differently, but now we wouldn’t read our ancient Egyptian texts any other way.  Similarly at the time of William Shakespeare, nobody gave a toss about fixed spelling (Bill spelt his name in several different ways) but these days we’re always getting ourselves worked up about kids using text speak instead of proper English.

Obviously we’ve had a lot of chat about the digital revolution on this blog, what with the Great Kindle Challenge and asking almost all interviewees for their thoughts on eBooks and such.  But what is the next evolutionary step in reading experience?  I’m glad you asked.

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Author Interview – Gemma Malley

Today I am posting an interview with YA author Gemma Malley (who you might also have come across as Chick Lit writer Gemma Townley, sister of Madeleine Wickham/Sophie Kinsella – totally irrelevant to this article but nevertheless quite interesting!)  I first came across her when I was working at the library and picked up a shiny copy of The Declaration, the first in a trilogy set in a future where drugs have eliminated old age and people are prevented from having children because there’s no room for them.  It’s well worth a read, as are the other books in the series, The Resistance and The Legacy – particularly if you like a bit of future dystopia. Continue reading “Author Interview – Gemma Malley”

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